HomeFORMULA 1

F1: Ferrari also ‘flattens’ the rear suspension, and we tell you why Red Bull can not

After Bottas beat Verstappen at the Turkish GP, Red Bull, as we discussed in this forum, discovered a system to “flatten” the rear of the car on th


After Bottas beat Verstappen at the Turkish GP, Red Bull, as we discussed in this forum, discovered a system to “flatten” the rear of the car on the straights. That ingenuity, in communion with the Intercooler (declared legal by the FIA) that sends ‘cooled’ air to the power plant, have given Mercedes an appreciable advantage within the enormous parity with Red Bull. This has been accomplished without adding a horsepower to the engine.

Now Sam Collins and Craig Scarborough, two F1 studious journalists, have discovered that also Ferrari benefited in the last races with the adoption of similar solutions. To the improvement in the accumulation and management of the electrical part of its power plant, Maranello has added a reformulation of the degree of incidence of the car on the straights to avoid drag and thus improve top speed.

While all teams use gadgets of this type to prevent straight drag, the Red Bull / Alpha Tauri teams, with their rake (height difference between the rear and front axle) so wide, only manage to ‘flatten’ the car near full throttle.

What is the peculiarity that allows Germans and Italians to gain efficiency on the straight? In acceleration, both the front and rear suspension lower the ground clearance, but in Mercedes, and to a lesser extent in Ferrari, the rear part lowers more than the front, and it does so immediately and completely from the start of the race. acceleration.

Yeda will a Yeongam be scored?

On the weekend of December 3-5, the first Formula 1 Saudi Arabian Grand Prix will be held. But the Jeddah circuit is less than half-built with just five weeks to go. A Tilke circuit was never built in less than ten months (it can take up to a year and a half of continuous work), and the Jeddah project should be completed in eight.

F1: Ferrari also 'flattens' the rear suspension, and we tell you why Red Bull can not

The biggest problem may be to repeat the gaffe that that 2010 South Korean GP with a Yeongam circuit with the asphalt still oozing the oils of a recent asphalt. In that case, the rains turned the race into a lottery (which perhaps cost Mark Webber’s World Cup that year and was won by Alonso).