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“I was criticized by many people”

Until 11 years ago, Libyan women could not box. For more than three decades they had it strictly prohibited. The toughest fight is fought


Until 11 years ago, Libyan women could not box. For more than three decades they had it strictly prohibited. The toughest fight is fought on the street… with a society that judges them. They fight to normalize that women can lead a healthy life thanks to sport.

They hit inequality hard

Sabah Mounir is a boxer and a mirror in which many Libyan girls looking for a tool to find themselves better could look. She is a faithful defender of boxing as a way to feel free and healthy. The young Libyan assures that boxing is a liberation: “Our society tells girls that practicing boxing is a shame but it is just the opposite.”

“Our society tells girls that practicing boxing is a shame but it is just the opposite” Sabah Mounir

In Libya, boxing centers for women have proliferated a lot with the aim of encouraging more girls. Sabah Mounir invites other girls to try it to feel more confident at all levels: “If you’re an athlete, it’s good for your health. You could also defend yourself if you’re harassed on the street and you wouldn’t be afraid.”

Boxing in the “club of the stars”

Antena 3 Deportes entered the “club of the stars” in one of those boxing centers where a group of teenage girls exercises. And we see them empowered, slapping for equality and paving the way for other brave women. It hasn’t been easy for Heba Shalin to take the step: “I was criticized by many people. They told me they were going to hit me in the face. I didn’t care. I fought against them.”

“I was criticized by many people. I did not care. I fought against them” Heba Shalin

A fight of giants, one more small step in a country where being a woman is very difficult.