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Low weight and greater efficiency is what Adrian Newey asks of Formula 1

Although his RB18 looks like the car to beat this season, Adrian Newey believes changes to the technical regulations are tipping Formula 1 in the w


Although his RB18 looks like the car to beat this season, Adrian Newey believes changes to the technical regulations are tipping Formula 1 in the wrong direction. The Red Bull technical director was of the opinion that although the average overtaking per race has increased, the single-seaters have not evolved significantly since now they weigh about 800 kilos and their efficiency, both mechanical and aerodynamic, is less compared to other recently manufactured cars.

According to Newey’s criterion, Formula 1 is sending the wrong message to the auto industry because it is replicating the trend of creating heavier cars when it should be the other way around. A Formula 1 car should be small, light and efficient. He indicated that the current generation of single-seaters are inefficient in many terms, including aerodynamics, since by regulation they have become more resistant to air so that they can follow each other more closely.

He was also critical of the amount of power required to move the car since a car of 800 kilos needs to use much more energy than one of 600, whether it is generated by fossil fuel, biofuel or electric batteries. All of these musings come about because Newey and his team are trying to get the RB18 to lose weight without compromising reliability. For Newey, what has been proposed for this season does not represent a significant change because basically what was done was to reduce the sensitivity of the cars to avoid turbulence when they are close to each other and thus facilitate overtaking.

In the words of Adrian Newey:

Cars have gotten bigger, heavier and not particularly aerodynamically efficient because they have so much air resistance. Obviously, this direction is wrong, it is the same one that the automotive industry in general has recently developed: cars getting bigger and heavier as long as the obsession of people, whether they drive on batteries or on gasoline, is the amount of energy it takes to move the damn thing, regardless of where that energy comes from.

Via | PlanetF1